Tuesday, September 27, 2005

Digital Photography

We are working this week with digital photos and talking about some of the issues - such as the ease of altering a photo with software, the availablity of graphic photos online that a news org might choose not to run, amateur photos making it into the news, etc. Here are some links to some readings on these topics ... (Note: A few of these articles discuss graphic news and amateur images and provide links if you choose to view them)

Readings:
One Image, One Word – the power of photos

The Photo Revolution Has Begun - from Poynter.org

Beyond Taste: Editing the Truth – the issue of altering photos for news use, from Poynter.org

Magazine Covers: Photojournalism or Illustration? – the issue of altering mag cover photos , from Poynter.org

The Martha Stewart Newsweek cover

Other cover alterations - from Darmouth class on Digital Media

War Images as Eyewitnesses - from Poynter.org

OJR piece on new controversey with war images - Online Journalism Review

1 comment:

M. Junaid Alam said...

Professor:

Under the link "http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~farid/research/digitaltampering/"

The site introduction reads:

"Photography, of course, lost its innocence many years ago. In as early as 1929, for example, shortly after the first commercially available camera was introduced, Lenin had his enemies "air-brushed" out of photographs."

The site then provides an image of what appears to be V.I. Lenin and Leon Trotsky, with the altered image of Trotsky removed.

I think there is a factual error here: Lenin did not "airbrush his enemies", certainly not in "1929", since he was dead by 1924. Lenin also issued a "last testament" before his death which was critical of Stalin, not Trotsky:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenin's_Testament


Moreover, it was Stalin who expelled the Left Opposition to which Trotsky belonged, and it was Stalin who ultimately had him and many other members of the Bolshevik Party assassinated, long after Lenin had already died.

In short, it was Stalin, not Lenin, who ordered the manipulation of photographs to remove political enemies from the picture.